Charnel

The team, which conducted an initial examination of the Bamiyan areas on Sunday, reported witnessing evidence of corpses. “The remains of at least four persons have been distinguished, and there are strong indications of some quantity of others yet to be uncovered,” spokesman Manoel de Almeida e Silva told reporters in Kabul. “There are indications of other similar sites, yet to be investigated, elsewhere in the region,” he added.Among its recommendations, the team called for securing the sites until follow-up investigations have been concluded, and for carrying out “a broader survey, to identify other such sites,” according to Mr. de Almeida e Silva.A new group of both UN and national experts, including forensic specialists, will be immediately assembled and dispatched in order to undertake a more conclusive investigation, according to the spokesman.On another development, the spokesman said that Lakhdar Brahimi, Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s Special Representative for Afghanistan, was deeply saddened over the death of Shah Sayed, a staff member of the UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) who had been shot by gunmen on Wednesday in his home in Mazar-i-Sharif. The spokesman called Mr. Sayed’s death “part of a disturbing pattern of attacks on civilians including humanitarian personnel in the northern region in recent months.” He added that Mr. Brahimi would be meeting with authorities in Kabul to discuss measures to ensure the protection of aid workers – “a priority in light of this tragic event and the chain of security incidents in recent months.”Mr. Brahimi, along with other senior UN officials, will travel to Mazar-i-Sharif on Sunday to meet aid workers, “who are very concerned about their safety and security and that of their families and colleagues,” Mr. de Almeida e Silva said. “The Special Representative will also meet with local leaders and impress upon them their responsibility and obligations to guarantee the safety of humanitarian aid workers and to safeguard humanitarian activities.” read more