Albino

The World Food Programme (WFP) said the funds are needed to assist some 60,000 of about 95,000 people who have either settled in makeshift camps or moved in with Chadian families along the precarious border between the two countries. They are considered the worst-off of a growing number of Sudanese fleeing the three Darfur provinces in western Sudan as civil war between the Sudanese Government and the Sudan Liberation Army (SLA) continues to rage there. The WFP appeal comes as the UN’s refugee agency announced plans to speed up the relocation of many of those refugees to safer camps away from the border, where they have been exposed to repeated raids by militia groups. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) said it expects to begin pre-registering the first refugees on Thursday, ahead of the expected transfer to a refugee camp being constructed at Farchana, 55 kilometres from the Chad-Sudan border. The Farchana camp should now be ready to accept its first refugees this weekend, several days earlier than previously expected, following construction by UNHCR and the German non-governmental organization GTZ. But UNHCR cautioned that the relocation would take several weeks because of poor road conditions and logistical problems. Up to 9,000 people are expected to live in the Farchana camp once it is completed. The refugees will receive a food package, which includes enough sorghum, corn flour and oil for 15 days, from WFP when they arrive. They will also be vaccinated and receive blankets, mattresses, mosquito nets, kitchen sets, soap and jerry cans from UNHCR. The Chadian Government and UNHCR have identified two other potential sites for refugee camps which will house 28,000 people between them. read more

“All people suffering from viral hepatitis deserve access to the same level of care and treatment available in the community,” the Executive Director of UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), Yury Fedotov, said in his message for the Day. “If interventions are to be effective, they must be grounded in respect for the human rights and right to health of all sufferers,” Mr. Fedotov added. Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver, most commonly caused by a viral infection. There are five main hepatitis viruses, referred to as types A, B, C, D and E, which lead to 1.4 million deaths every year. Hepatitis C can lead to liver diseases such as cirrhosis and cancer, and infection is widespread among injecting drug users. According to UNODC’s 2013 World Drug Report, global prevalence of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs is estimated at 51 per cent. Among the prison populations, hepatitis infection is also many, many times higher than in the general population, UNODC said, noting that a majority of people detained will return to their communities, some within months. “Many of those infected with hepatitis are unaware, and therefore may go undiagnosed and untreated, posing a risk of transmission to their families, coworkers and neighbours,” Mr. Fedotov noted. UNODC and its UN partners promote an integrated response to preventing hepatitis and providing treatment and care, the senior UN official said. This includes comprehensive packages of interventions for injecting drug users and prisoners to stop the spread of HIV and other infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and C. Necessary measures include treating drug dependency and instituting condom programmes, as well as needle and syringe programmes. The UN World Health Organization (WHO) is currently developing new hepatitis C screening, care and treatment guidelines, which will provide recommendations on seven key areas such as testing approaches; behavioural interventions (alcohol reduction); non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis; and the selection of hepatitis C drug combinations. The World Health Assembly – the decision-making body of WHO – designated 28 July as World Hepatitis Day. The Day serves to promote greater understanding of hepatitis as a global public health problem and to stimulate the strengthening of preventive and control measures against infection in countries throughout the world. Coinciding with this year’s marking of the Day, WHO released its first-ever country hepatitis survey. Covering 126 countries, the ‘Global policy report on the prevention and control of viral hepatitis in WHO member States’ identifies successes as well as gaps at country level in the implementation of four priority areas: raising awareness, evidence-based data for action, prevention of transmission, and screening, care and treatment. The findings show that only one-third of the world’s countries have national strategies for viral hepatitis, leading WHO to urge Governments to scale up measures to tackle the spread of the disease. read more

first_imgMirren has described her time with Neeson as “a wonderful relationship”Credit:The Picture Library Liam Neeson and Helen Mirren were together for four year in the 1980sCredit:Richard Young/REX/Shutterstock Neeson, 65, recalled: “Before I met her and we worked together, I had read somewhere that if she fancied a guy she would imitate his walk behind his back. And I turned around one day and she was doing that to me. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Neeson moved to Hollywood in 1987 and made his name, earning an Oscar nomination for his performance in the 1993 film Schindler’s List. At 65, he has reinvented himself as an action star.He married the actress Natasha Richardson in 1994 and they had two children. She died in a skiing accident in 2009.Dame Helen, 72, began a relationship with Taylor Hackford, a US director, a year after her split from Neeson. They married in 1997. Liam Neeson and Helen Mirrencenter_img Meeting up with an old flame can be awkward, particularly when the relationship ended in heartbreak.Not so for Dame Helen Mirren and Liam Neeson. The pair were reunited on a chat show sofa, more than 30 years after their split, and shared warm memories of their love affair – with Neeson confiding that he was “smitten” from their first encounter.Many film fans are unaware that the two actors were once a couple, who met in 1980 on the set of John Boorman’s Excalibur. Neeson was in his first major role, as Sir Gawain, and Dame Helen was playing Morgana.Appearing on BBC One’s The Graham Norton Show to promote their latest films – Dame Helen stars in a horror film, Winchester, and Neeson in action thriller The Commuter – the pair were asked about their dating history.“We didn’t date, we lived together for four years. We were a serious item for a while. Lucky me!” said Dame Helen. Neeson moved in to Dame Helen’s London flat but struggled to find work, as her career went from strength to strength.In a 1994 profile of Neeson, Dame Helen said: “It was difficult for him to be under my shadow. I was well known. I had the money.” Eventually, they decided it was time for Neeson “to come out from under my wing. He handled it with great elegance and grace. We loved each other. It was difficult to let go.” Helen Mirren and Liam Neeson “I remember being on the set and standing with Ciaran Hinds as Helen walked towards us dressed in her full Morgana le Fay costume, and we both went, ‘Oh f—.’ I was smitten. I think Ciaran was too, but I was very smitten.”Dame Helen laughed: “I never knew that. You’ve never told me that before – it’s amazing!”At the time, the actress was well known for her stage work and had made her film breakthrough in The Long Good Friday. Neeson, seven years her junior, was at the beginning of his career.He has said in the past that watching Dame Helen on set was “mesmeric. She was so sexy. I thought, gosh, that’s Helen Mirren! She was as beautiful up close as on stage. Just so human. I was in love with this extraordinary human being.” He told one interviewer: “Can you imagine riding horses in shiny suits of armour, having sword fights, and you’re falling in love with Helen Mirren? It doesn’t get any better than that.”last_img read more