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first_imgDear Editor,“If it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck”. The Duck Test is used to draw inference from customary behaviour and to highlight the obvious. Let’s take two pertinent examples:The decisions of the Chairman of GECOM thus far has led to more delays and confusion with our elections. GECOM is mandated under the Constitution to be in a state of perpetual readiness. However, nothing the Chairman, the CEO and the DCEO do inspires confidence. Naturally, this benefits the ANPU/AFC Administration that is banking on GECOM’s unpreparedness to remain in office illegally following its defeat by the NCM almost one year ago. In the meanwhile, it continues to abuse taxpayers’ dollars to buy votes and for other sinister purposes.The Iron Lady has been uncharacteristically flexible and people are doubtful if she will hold free and fair elections. She, Madam Chairman, is persisting with the data from the flawed H2H. This is despite the fact that evidence is coming to light which shows that the list is heavily padded. In the circumstances, the Duck Test is fitting. It is also instructive to note that the PNC has habitually rigged elections whenever it has been in office and, therefore, had the opportunity to do so. I am not a pessimist but I am still to be convinced that GECOM and the Iron Lady will deliver free and fair elections on March 2, 2020.The caretaker and possibly illegal Government are insisting on selling Guyana’s first three tranches of crude on the spot market when this method is itself crude and moreover when this will generate the lowest possible revenue outcome for the nation. Why then is the Government persisting with it? Well, this method can be executed in a very short period of time and with elections around the corner, time is of the essence and the boys need money.Secondly, the spot purchase being contemplated brings the seller in direct contact with the buyer, paving the way for shenanigans under the table. Applying the Duck Test, it is obvious that Granger and his cabal are desperate to get their hands on the oil money before the elections. But Guyanese are not fools. They are aware that democracy ceased to exist in our country several months ago and that the illegal Government is operating outside the rule of law. The worse thing we can do is choose to remain silent at this time.Sincerely,Ravi Ramlast_img read more

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first_imgThe principal of the Gbarnsue-Sulonma Elementary Public School in Zota District, Bong County has resigned, and subsequently left the classroom, “because the government has not paid me for the length of time I have served in the position.”Speaking on a local radio station in Gbarnga on Thursday September 13, 2018, Ranney Kollie told a local radio station in Gbarnga yesterday, September 13, that he reached the decision because authorities at the Ministry of Education (MoE) have not placed his name on government’s payroll over the years.The Ministry of Education’s (MoE) director of communications, denied receiving the report, but described Mr. Kollie’s decision as “unfortunate, because the Ministry has documented his case as some of the challenges to address in the shortest possible time.”However, Kollie told the station that since he graduated from the Zorzor Rural Teacher Training Institute in Lofa County in 2013, and got assigned at the Gbarnsue-Sulonma Public School as principal, “my name his not been placed on government payroll, rather preferring to maintain my name on the supplementary teachers’ listing.”Supplementary teachers are those whose names are not on the regular payroll, but are paid at the discretion of the government despite their qualification and experience in the teaching filed.Mr. Kollie disclosed that, at the school, there are 150 students with seven teachers assigned by the government, but disappointingly, none of them is on the payroll since 2013, but have continued to work as classroom teachers.“Many of the teachers are leaving the classrooms because of the workload, but no salary; some of us cannot be working without getting the dividend, while others who are not doing the work continue to enjoy  the benefits,” remarked Mr. Kollie.He has therefore vowed never to return to the classroom until the government can place his name, and the names of some of his colleagues on the regular payroll.Kollie added, “we have been teaching for the past 15 years, but the government has done nothing to resolve this age-old problem.”He told the local stations how he has made several attempts to get the matter amicably resolved in his favor,” but it appears that the government is insensitive to their plight. We wonder why the government is reluctant to place our name on its regular payroll since some of us have the requisite qualification, and experience.”Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgCSEC resultsThe pass rate for Mathematics at this year’s Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examination was well below 50 per cent and the Education Ministry has squarely blamed these results on a few structural changes in the papers.Chief Education Officer Marcel HutsonChief Education Officer Marcel Hutson said at a recent engagement that this ‘little shift’ directly affected the children and, thus, caused a mere 43 per cent overall pass percentage.“Mathematics came in at 43 per cent, the same thing we had last year, but there was a little shift in terms of the structure of the paper. The concept was there and so the shift threw some of our children off track but you learn from lessons,” Hutson indicated.The senior education official, however, informed that they will review these results and employ a newer approach to produce better results. He stated that teachers need additional training in content and methodology.“I could say that we are now familiar with the shift and what CXC will be doing but not withstanding all of that, we will continue to train our teachers in content and methodology because I think those two areas are critical…Mathematics is a subject area that will require lots of practice and familiarity the different strands and therefore concentration will be focused on those particular areas”.In just over eight months, students from across the country will sit the examinations again. In fact, preparations would have already begun with those who would enter their final year in September. As such, Hutson is convinced that the performance will develop.“We believe that come next year, you will see an improved performance in Mathematics and…I think we will be better prepared to deal with the concepts…The improvement that we would have seen in many of those areas were as a result of workshops, training sessions and basically have to do with building capacity with our teachers and, so we have seen that”.This year, some 11, 467 students were registered to sit the examinations this year with 67,000 subject entries. Apart from Mathematics, there was improvement for English Language, with a 77 per cent overall success as opposed to 67 per cent in 2018. The performance improved across 21 subject areas while seven showed constant figures. Seven subject areas demonstrated declines namely – Caribbean History, Economics, English B, Integrated Science, Human and Social Biology, Textiles and Clothing, and French.For the science subjects, there were improvements in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, and both double and single awards Agricultural Science. This followed for the business subjects, being evident in Office Administration, Principles of Business and Principles of Accounts, whereas Electronic Documentation Preparation and Management (EDPM) maintained constant performance.last_img read more

first_imgCarli Lloyd enjoyed the game of her life as the United States beat Japan 5-2 to win the Women’s World Cup.Barely 15 minutes had elapsed when Lloyd put the USA 4-0 up, completing her World Cup final hat-trick with a goal from the halfway line – a career peak surely beyond the dreams of any player, male or female.Lauren Holiday had volleyed the third and though Japan pulled one back through Yuki Ogimi and another when Julie Johnston put through her own goal, Tobin Heath’s goal quickly eased any doubts over the result.Jill Ellis’ side thus avenged their defeat in the 2011 final between these sides, to the delight of the majority of the 53,341 crowd in Vancouver.The Americans took the lead with the first attack of note, Megan Rapinoe drilling in a low corner towards the penalty spot where Lloyd, having timed her run perfectly across Azusa Iwashimizu, diverted the ball home to score for the fourth game in succession.And it was clearly a tactical plan as two minutes later, Holiday sent in a low free-kick which bobbled off defenders on the six-yard line for Lloyd to poke in.It was 3-0 inside the first quarter-hour as the shell-shocked Iwashimizu, having lost Lloyd at both set-pieces, misjudged a clearance horribly and Holiday finished with a fine volley.But that classy finish went all but unnoticed as just over a minute later, Lloyd let fly from 60 yards and keeper Ayumi Kaihori back-pedalled, stumbled and could only touch the ball onto the inside of the post before it nestled in the net.Improbably, it almost got even better for Lloyd moments later as she headed Meghan Klingenberg’s cross just wide, before Mizuho Sakaguchi finally had Japan’s first effort on goal.They at least managed to pull a goal back, Nahomi Kawasumi crossing from the right to Ogimi, who turned Johnston superbly and finished inside the far post.They went close to a second when Shinobu Ohno pulled the ball back but Aya Miyama could not beat Hope Solo from the edge of the box.Japan coach Norio Sasaki put Iwashimizu out of her misery in the 33rd minute as Homare Sawa came on to win the 205th cap of her illustrious career – and made a second change before the interval, bringing on Yuika Sugasawa for Kawasumi.Kaihori did well to take Rapinoe’s corner with Lloyd again closing in and limit the damage to 4-1 at half-time.Lloyd’s mishit cross just cleared the crossbar and Kaihori tipped Morgan Brian’s 25-yard drive over – but Japan had hope seven minutes after the interval when Aya Miyama’s free-kick from a deep position glanced off the head of Johnston, wrong-footing keeper Hope Solo for an unfortunate own goal.It was quickly snuffed out, though, as another Rapinoe corner was not dealt with and Brian set up Heath to finish from six yards.Mana Iwabuchi replaced Ohno in Japan’s final substitution on the hour before Kelley O’Hara, a scorer in USA’s semi-final win over Germany, replaced Rapinoe.Japan’s Rumi Utsugi went close with a long-range volley before Alex Morgan shot just wide at the other end.Iwabuchi’s loose touch allowed Johnston to get a challenge in, and the same attacker then saw a header comfortably saved.There were farewell World Cup appearances for veteran US stars Abby Wambach and Christie Rampone before American celebrations rang around BC Place at the final whistle.Lloyd was named as player of the tournament ahead of France’s Amandine Henry, with Miyama third on a shortlist of eight which featured England’s Lucy Bronze.Solo took the Golden Gloves as best goalkeeper, Lloyd collected the silver ball as runner-up to top scorer Celia Sasic of Germany while Canada defender Kadeisha Buchanan was the young player of the tournament.In FIFA president Sepp Blatter’s absence the global governing body was represented at the presentation ceremony by Cameroonian delegate Issa Hayatou.The States formed a guard of honour for their opponents to collect their medals before squad captain Rampone, after her 308th and last international appearance, donned the armband to lift the trophy alongside Wambach.last_img read more

first_imgLetterkenny has its fair share of eating houses to cater for its bustling population.One of Alana’s mouthwatering dishes!But one of the newest kids on the block is an unlikely contender as a place to make a regular stopping-off spot.‘Fingers and forks’ is the brainchild of young local chef Alana Gallagher. A graduate of the Killybegs Catering College, Letterkenny woman Alana has brought her culinary skills to the Voodoo Lounge.While at night Voodoo may be thumping to the sounds of the latest beats, during the day it is a much more relaxing affair.In fact, the chilled out atmosphere of the bar offers the perfect surroundings for Alana’s food.The woman behind the superb food at Fingers and Forks at Voodoo Lounge in Letterkenny.Available from 12.30pm until 10.30pm, the menu offers everything from sandwiches with a twist to splendid seafood platters. On the day we visited, there were a few bodies who have already cottoned on to Alana’s culinary offerings.After we ordered, Alana surprised us with a bowl of pea and ham soup.Not being a lover of soup, and certainly not peas, I was nervous.Needless to say my companion reminded me that I said I didn’t like soup as I scraped the end of the bowl. Perfection!My companion had a seafood platter as a main which looked like it had just come off the boat at Greencastle it looked so fresh. He assured me it tasted as good as it looked.The surprisingly stunning pea and ham soup.I opted for the chargrilled chicken Panini and it was cooked to perfection complete with a generous portion of handmade chips.We didn’t have time for dessert but they looked to die for.Voodoo might not be the first place you might think of for lunch or a bite of bar-food. But once you gets your ‘fingers and forks’ into Alana Gallagher’s cooking, you’ll be back.Give it a go.WHY ALANA’S FOOD IS WORTH GETTING YOUR ‘FINGERS AND FORKS’ INTO! was last modified: February 24th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Alana GallagherFingers and ForksVoodoo Loungelast_img read more

first_imgFRIDAY Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Emotional Freedom Technique Group offers weekly demonstrations and practices, 6:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends). Self-help tapping technique used to reduce or eliminate stress, cravings, pains, fears, phobias. Call (661) 945-4045. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30 p.m. Sunday at 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $7. Club membership: $20. Call (661) 718-8997. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with panic attacks, anxiety or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, third floor. Call (661) 943-3956. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will meet for its weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club will meet, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_img8 July 2013The Proteas’ 2013/14 home schedule, released by Cricket South Africa on Monday, includes highly anticipated test series against India and Australia, backed up by seven one-day and five T20 international matches.The Proteas, ranked number one in the world test ranking, will play three tests against both countries. India occupies second place in the ICC test rankings, while Australia is in fourth.The Indians last toured South Africa in 2006/07 and convincingly won the first test by 123 runs in Johannesburg, after dismissing the Proteas for only 84 in their first innings. South Africa, though, fought back to win the second test by 174 runs and clinched a 2-1 series win with a five-wicket victory in the third and deciding test.Philander’s debutAustralia last visit to South Africa was in the 2011/12 season, when they played only two tests. The Proteas scored a resounding eight-wicket victory in the first test, despite making only 96 in their first innings, after debutant Vernon Philander knocked over 5 for 15 in the Australians’ second innings of just 47 all out.Australia, however, shared the series’ spoils after a tense two-wicket win at The Wanderers in the second test.There will be seven one-day internationals played against India, which recently won the ICC Champions Trophy, and is ranked number one in the 50-overs format. South Africa is ranked fourth.Five T20 internationals are on the cards for the sixth-ranked Proteas, two of them against the world number three Indians and three against Australia, who are ranked one place below South Africa.Indian tourIndia’s tour kicks off on 18 November with a match against a South African Invitation XI in Potchefstoom. It runs through until the third test match, which will be played in Johannesburg from 15 to 19 January.Australia’s tour starts shortly after that on 5 February in the same manner as India’s tour, with a game against a South African Invitation XI at Senwes Park. It ends on 14 March with a T20 international at Centurion.Commenting on the schedule, CSA Acting CEO Naasei Appiah said on the CSA website: “It promises to be a wonderful summer of hotly contested international cricket.“India are the current undisputed champions of 50 overs cricket and it was not that long ago that they briefly held the number one ranking in test cricket as well.Sachin Tendulkar“The Indian players have always been very popular in South Africa and their maestro, Sachin Tendulkar, has currently played a world record 198 test matches. It would be wonderful for his 200th test match to be in front of a packed New Year’s crowd at Sahara Park Newlands.“The last time he played a test match there, his battle with Dale Steyn thrilled a global audience.”Looking at the series against Australia, Appiah said: “Any series between Australia and South Africa in any sporting code always promises a spectacle of note and a contest worthy of some of sport’s most famous moments. Australia will be battle-hardened after successive home and away Ashes series against England.“The three KFC T20 International matches at the end of the tour will provide perfect preparation for both sides for next year’s ICC World Twenty20.”Details of the ticket sales have not yet been announced.TOUR SCHEDULESIndia Tour 18 Nov: T20: India v SA Invitation XI, Potchefstroom21 Nov: 1st T20 International, Johannesburg (Day/Night)24 Nov: 2nd T20 International, Cape Town (Day)27 Nov: 1st ODI, Durban (Day/Night)30 Nov: 2nd ODI, Port Elizabeth (Day)3 Dec: 3rd ODI, East London (Day/Night)6 Dec: 4th ODI, Centurion (Day/Night)8 Dec: 5th ODI, Johannesburg (Day)12 Dec: 6th ODI, Bloemfontein (Day/Night)15 Dec: 7th ODI, Cape Town (Day)18-19 Dec: India v SA Invitation XI, Paarl22-23 Dec: India v SA Invitation XI, Pietermaritzburg26-30 Dec: 1st test, Durban2-6 Jan: 2nd test, Cape Town15-19 Jan: 3rd test, Johannesburg Australia Tour 5-8 Feb: Australia v SA Invitation XI, Potchefstroom12-16 Feb: 1st test, Centurion20-24 Feb: 2nd test match, Port Elizabeth1-5 Mar: 3rd test match, Cape Town9 Mar: 1st T20 International, Port Elizabeth (Day)12 Mar: 2nd T20 International, Durban (Day/Night)14 Mar: 3rd KFC T20 International, Centurion (Day/Night)last_img read more

first_imgJohn Ball faces the usual questions as he decides on a heating system for his new home: What system will deliver the best results at the lowest price? What will keep Ball and his wife comfortable in their Canadian locale in Climate Zone 7?But there’s something else that Ball has to consider: Their new retirement home will be empty during the winter when they’re in Florida escaping the snow and the cold. As they get older, and health care becomes more expensive, they expect to be returning to Canada on a year-round basis.As a result, Ball explains in Q&A post at GreenBuildingAdvisor, he has to plan on two scenarios: one for now, and one for later.He’s been given a long list of options so far, including a ground-source heat pump with a radiant-floor distribution system, an air-to-water heat pump, an electric resistance water heater or boiler, and an air-source heat pump.“We are totally confused as to what type of system to install,” he writes. “We are on a restricted budget so solutions like a ground-source heat pump are out, and we do not have access to natural gas. We are looking for a balance between initial system cost and efficiency. Heating is not critical now as we spend our winters in Florida, but as Canadians we will eventually find health care costs prohibitive and need to stay home in winter.”One particular concern is whether the concrete slab for his slab-on-grade home will feel cold in the winter. Winter usually brings a few days of 35 below zero weather, so he’s considering doubling the amount of rigid foam beneath the slab, from 2 inches to 4 inches. Skip the radiant floorStephen Sheehy’s advice is not to choose a radiant-floor distribution system. “With a tight, well-insulated house,” he says, “you’ll find the heating system often not running enough to keep the floor warm.”He also disagrees with Dorsett’s suggestion for setting the floor temperature slightly above the room temperature. “If the floor is 25°F below body temperature, you may not get warm feet,” Sheehy says. “A basic question is this: In winter, do you usually walk around in bare feet?”No bare feet, Ball replies, but the flooring will consist of ceramic tile and engineered wood (no carpet), so the idea is not to have any really cold surfaces under foot.Skipping the in-floor heat would be Charlie Sullivan’s vote as well. “If you have the slab and the building well insulated, the slab will reach equilibrium with the room temperature,” he writes. “Whether the slab is unheated and at 19° or 20°C (66° to 68°F), or heated to 21°C (70°F), or even 23°C (73°F), makes surprisingly little difference in how it feels to your bare feet… In all cases, heat is conducted away from your feet into the floor, and how cold it feels has more to do with the thermal conductivity of the floor surface material than a few degrees of temperature difference.“If you insulate well and have a flooring material with moderate to low thermal conductivity, such as wood or carpet, you won’t have a problem with the floor being too cold,” Sullivan says. All About Radiant FloorsGBA Encyclopedia: Heat DistributionGBA Encyclopedia: Green Heating OptionsRadiant-Floor HeatingHeating a Tight, Well-Insulated House Air-to-air heat pump can be the heart of the systemBall can now add some price estimates to the discussion.An air-to-air heat pump would be the least expensive option. A ductless minisplit (air-source heat pump) paired with an electric boiler is next, costing an additional $5,000, and the air-to-water heat pump with an electric boiler is $15,000 more than a simple air-to-air heat pump.A consensus seems to be emerging, says GBA senior editor Martin Holladay: Skip the floor heat and insulate the slab.If Ball ends up choosing an air-to-air heat pump, Holladay adds, he should make sure the system is rated for below-zero operation. “Equipment from either Mitsubishi or Fujitsu would work; you may even want to consider using Mitsubishi’s new MVZ air handler paired with a Mitsubishi HyperHeat outdoor unit (although this approach isn’t the most efficient),” Holladay says. “If you’re worried about keeping the house warm when the temperature drops to -30°F, a couple of electric-resistance space heaters are all you need.”Neither the Mitsubishi nor Fujitsu units have the option of built-in electric-resistance heat for very cold weather. Holladay suggests that Ball could buy one or two electric-resistance heaters at any hardware store, although Ball doubts that arrangement would work in a 2,000-sq. ft. house when the temperature falls to 30 below zero for several days.“For the ductless minisplit approach to work, you need the pay attention to the thermal envelope of your new home, making sure that insulation levels are higher than minimum code requirements; that air leakage rates are as low as possible; and that high-performance windows are specified,” Holladay says. “Installing enough linear feet of electric-resistance baseboard heat to help your home ride through the occasional cold snap is not particularly difficult or expensive. That said, if the approach makes you nervous, you can install a propane-fired furnace or an oil-fired furnace if you want.” Consider performance in very cold weatherOne of the options is an air-to-water heat pump, such as the Daikin Altherma. However, Dana Dorsett points out that the Daikin is somewhat expensive and probably wouldn’t be able to keep up with the coldest days in Climate Zone 7.“An electric boiler is very cheap to install,” he adds, “but more expensive to operate, and you may need one to cover the shortfall on the Altherma when it’s -20°F outside.” The Altherma has no specified output below -4°F, he says.If Ball won’t be around during the winter, Dorsett says, he might want to consider the Fujitsu air-to-air heat pump (the RSL3H product line), which has a specified heat output at -15°F but will continue to run in lower temperatures.“You can use an electric boiler slaved to a floor thermostat to keep the slab from feeling cold (but only when you’re there), and use the minisplit to maintain the room temperature (all the time),” Dorsett suggests. “You can buy a lot of RLS3H for the price of an Altherma — they’re nice and quiet, too.”With an electric boiler heating the slab, setting the floor temperature a couple of degrees above the room temperature “guarantees barefoot comfort,” he adds.“To make sure that the minisplits are pulling the bulk of the load, you may need to buy a hard-wired wall thermostat, since the setpoints will have an offset when it’s just sensing the temp of the incoming air at the head,” Dorsett says.center_img “We are open to any solution,” he says. “What would you suggest?” RELATED ARTICLES Our expert’s opinionHere’s what GBA technical director Peter Yost had to say:It’s hard to give good guidance without full information about the climate, the design of the home, and details on patterns of occupancy. It turns out that John Ball’s home is located in northern New Brunswick in a rural area with very reliable grid electric power. The floor plan is pretty open and they routinely do a fairly aggressive nighttime setback of 5°C (9°F). Someone does check their house on a regular basis while they are away.In the past, Ball has had a high-efficiency wood stove (which could have handled the peak load for Ball when conditions max out any heat pump, at least when someone is there to feed the stove). But this time around, Ball is fine with backup/peak heat coming from any and all of these approaches: propane fireplace, electric fireplace, surface-mounted radiant electric heat, or baseboard electric heat.In terms of cooling, Ball says that few homes in their town have central AC systems because of great maritime breezes, but he is pretty concerned about heat gain in their master bedroom and great room, both with lots of glass to the southwest picking up their great view.(Side note: It has always amused me that historically, the peak electric load in Canada is generally the hottest day in summer, and the peak electric load in Florida is the coldest day in winter. The former is because space heating is largely non-electric in Canada, and the latter because all that strip heat in Florida is kicking in at the same time.)Ball also is quite open to photovoltaics over time, and although New Brunswick reports fewer than 50 homes with grid-connected PV systems, that is likely to change quite a bit in the near future. The province has set a goal of 40% renewable energy generation by 2020.So where does all this new information leave us? I’d make the following points:A minisplit cold-climate heat pump seems like a good fit, given Ball’s open floor plan. With a minisplit system, a nighttime setback is usually a mistake, since these heat pumps operate most efficiently without a setback. But if Ball wants the nighttime setback, that means either a “smart” thermostat that will ramp up based on weather info, and/or quick-acting spot heat for comfort such as the radiant surface-mount panels (while the outdoor temperature rises in the morning and the heat pump moves away from deep overnight lows).Ball is open to exterior shading devices to manage that southwest summer sun. Adjustable or fixed-but-seasonally-installed awnings can be both functional and attractive. And if this approach eliminates the need for summer space conditioning, maybe Ball would be open to a high-efficiency propane heating system, which could provide domestic hot water as well.We can all agree that putting as many dollars as Ball can into the performance of his building enclosure is a sure bet, regardless of the heating system(s) he chooses.Integrating grid-connected PV is becoming less expensive and more practical at an amazing pace; every project should be looking at how this fits into the picture.last_img read more

first_imgBy Molly C. HerndonAn email scam is circulating the inboxes of Department of Defense employees, military members, retirees, and civilian employees. The email comes from a .mil address, making it seem like legitimate correspondence, however, the email is seeking information that can cause great harm to your financial records.These emails are asking recipients to send copies of VA and IRS documents that contain personal and financial information, according to IRS.gov. These documents can include copies of VA award letters or income tax returns. The information contained on these documents is then used to commit identity theft by the phishers.If you receive any email requesting such information, simply delete the email. Do not respond.To view a complete list of suspicious emails and identity theft alerts generated by the IRS, please click here.“Phishing Scam Targets DOD” by Molly C. Herndon is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.last_img read more