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first_imgNew Delhi: The National Investigation Agency (NIA) is questioning Anees-ul-Islam, son of separatist leader Altaf Ahmed Shah, now lodged in Delhi’s Tihar Central Jail, in its investigation into terror funding. A senior NIA official told IANS: “Islam was summoned to appear before the NIA.” Islam is the grandson of Hurriyat Conference leader Syed Ali Shah Geelani, who advocates Jammu and Kashmir’s merger with Pakistan. Islam’s father is married to Geelani’s daughter. Also Read – How a psychopath killer hid behind the mask of a devout laity! The NIA arrested Islam’s father in 2017. It registered a case of terror funding for the violence in the Kashmir Valley in May and July 2017. Besides Shah, the agency has arrested Aftab Hilali Shah alias Shahid-ul-Islam, Ayaz Akbar Khandey, Farooq Ahmad Dar alias Bitta Karate, Nayeem Khan, Altaf Ahmad Shah, Raja Mehrajuddin Kalwal and Bashir Ahmad Bhat alias Peer Saifullah. Shahid-ul-Islam is an aide of the Mirwaiz while Khandey is the spokesperson for the Geelani-led Hurriyat Conference.last_img read more

Rabat – Amidst an uproar over South Africa’s detention of a Moroccan shipment of 50,000 tons of phosphate worth USD 5 million in Port Elizabeth on Wednesday, Moroccan government has announced that “Morocco is in a proper legal situation.”“Morocco is in a legal position. The maneuvers of [Morocco’s] rivals will fail,” said Mustapha Khalfi, the Minister in charge of Relations with Parliament and Civil Society and Spokesperson of government, in a press conference held on Thursday.“The natural resources of the Moroccan Sahara are invested in the framework of international law and the requirements of national sovereignty,” Khalfi added. The legality of the detention has been called into question. According to Samir Bennis, co-founder and senior political analyst of Morocco World News, articles 17, 18, and 19 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea guarantee all states the right to traverse the territorial waters of other states. This right of “innocent passages” can only  be denied if the vessel in question constitutes a threat to the security of the coastal state, but so far no threat has been identified.The ship was detained after South Africa and the Algeria-backed Polisario Front complained that its cargo had been transported illegally from the Western Sahara.The NM Cherry Blossom, carrying the shipment for the OCP, was detained by a civil maritime order in Port Elizabeth, where it had stopped to re-fuel. Phosphate importers in New Zealand said that this is the first seizure of Moroccan shipments they had experienced in 30 years.The shipment’s owners, the Moroccan state-run Office Cherifien des Phosphates (OCP), have told the press that the seizure was a “very normal procedure” and a temporary measure pending the review of Polisario’s complaint.Polisario’s provocation comes after announcing its withdrawal last week from the Guerguerat buffer zone, where its militias had violated the 1991 UN ceasefire agreement by setting up illegal checkpoints to harass and threaten Moroccan truckers.The separatist force declared it would “redeploy” its forces the day before the UN Security Council voted to extend its Mission for Referendum in Western Sahara (MINURSO) for another year, with conditions favoring Morocco. read more

“Participated in good meeting with Opp Leader @PresRajapaksa n his team w #SriLanka PM @RW_UNP, @MangalaLK, Governor, Sec Treasury n officials on post 21/4 economic recovery program. Positive move to shed at least some political differences at a time like this, even temporarily,” Dr. Harsha de Silva tweeted. Finance Minister Mangala Samaraweera also attended the meeting. (Colombo Gazette) A delegation led by Opposition leader Mahinda Rajapaksa met Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe at Temple Trees today and discussed the economy.Non-cabinet Minister Dr. Harsha de Silva tweeted saying the talks focused on the economic recovery program following the Easter Sunday attacks. read more

Terje Roed-Larsen, Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s Special Envoy for the implementation of Security Council 1559, which focuses on an end to foreign interference in Lebanon, met in Riyadh today with Saudi Crown Prince Sultan bin Abdulaziz and Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal.Mr. Roed-Larsen lauded the important role played by the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the efforts to resolve the multiple conflicts in the Middle East. He characterized his talks with Saudi leaders as “constructive and forward-looking” with a “strong convergence of views.” “We are working hand in hand, and the Secretary-General and I are looking forward to continuing this partnership,” he said.Subject of the talks was the implementation of Security Council resolution 1559, which calls for the strict respect of Lebanon’s sovereignty and political independence, the withdrawal of foreign forces, and the disarming and disbanding of militias in the country. Discussions focused in particular on the ongoing national dialogue among all factions in Lebanon, which to date has yielded a consensus on the need to establish formal diplomatic relations between Syria and Lebanon and to delineate in full the international border between the two countries.“The implementation of Security Council resolution 1559 is proceeding in the context of a difficult and tense climate in the region, where a number of fires are burning at present, all of which impact on our efforts to fully implement the resolution,” said the envoy, who recently completed meetings in the capitals of all permanent members of the Security Council: China, France, the Russian Federation, the United Kingdom and the United States.He emphasized that achieving all the objectives outlined in resolution 1559 “remains high on the Secretary-General’s agenda.” read more

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email FILE – This Friday, Sept. 27, 2013 file photo shows the Empire State Building in midtown New York. The Federal Reserve of New York releases its March survey of manufacturers on Monday, March 16, 2015. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) New York manufacturing grows at slower pace in March as orders and shipments weaken WASHINGTON – Manufacturing activity in New York state expanded at a slightly slower pace in March, dragged by weaker shipments and new orders.The Federal Reserve Bank of New York said Monday that that its Empire State manufacturing index slipped to 6.9 in March from a reading of 7.8 in February.The survey adds to signs that factory output may be slowing after solid gains for much of last year. The rising value of the dollar has hurt exports by making American-made goods more expensive in overseas markets.While orders and shipments were lacklustre, labour markets showed promising strength, with solid gains in employment levels and a longer average workweek. Pricing pressures remained muted, with the index of prices manufacturers paid for materials down two points to 12.4.The New York Fed’s Empire State survey provides an early look at U.S. manufacturing each month. The New York Fed surveys 200 businesses in the state and typically receives responses from about 100. by Martin Crutsinger, The Associated Press Posted Mar 16, 2015 6:49 am MDT read more

Junior quarterback Braxton Miller (5) scores a touchdown during a game against Michigan Nov. 30. OSU won, 42-41. Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorThe Lantern’s sports editors share their thoughts on five things to look for in Ohio State’s showdown with Michigan State in the Big Ten Championship Game.1. Everything on the lineIn 2012, the OSU football team saw their season end after beating Michigan 26-21 to complete an undefeated season. In 2013, though, there is more football to play after The Game, and much more is on the line. For the first time in its brief three-year history, the Big Ten title game will have OSU (12-0, 8-0) as a participant with a potential spot in the BCS National Championship. Although coach Urban Meyer and the players have said all season they will take the schedule one game at a time, it is hard to believe a trip to Pasadena, Calif., will not be on their minds in some way. A win all but guarantees a finish in the top two of the BCS, sending OSU to its first title game since the 2007 season. That could all be derailed by the No. 10 Michigan State Spartans (11-1, 8-0) in Indianapolis Saturday at 8:17 p.m.2. The nation’s top rush defense v. the nation’s second best rushing attackSo far this year Michigan State has only allowed 64.8 yards rushing per game, with only two teams running for more than 100 yards against the Spartans. OSU comes in averaging 321.3 yards per game rushing and has only failed to run for more than 200 yards in a game once this season, against Wisconsin. Something has to give when these two units clash Saturday. OSU senior running back Carlos Hyde is on a tear of late, rushing for more than 200 yards in two of the last three games and not failing to eclipse the century mark since September. If the Spartans can manage to contain Hyde and force junior quarterback Braxton Miller to beat them with his arm, then things could get interesting for OSU. If not, then expect the Buckeyes to have the advantage and to come away with the victory.3. Can the OSU secondary bounce back?It hasn’t exactly been the season redshirt-junior Bradley Roby and the Buckeye secondary had been hoping for. Three of four starting members of 2012’s starters returned, but the Buckeyes have struggled to stop the pass this season. OSU is tied for 101st in the country, allowing 255.8 yards per game through the air. The secondary is coming off its worst performance of the year, in which it allowed Michigan to throw for 451 yards in OSU’s one-point win. Although the secondary came up when it mattered most, intercepting Wolverine redshirt-junior quarterback Devin Gardner’s two-point conversion attempt that would have won the game. The Spartans do rank second to last in the Big Ten in passing yards per game, so it will not be as stiff a challenge for OSU as in previous weeks. But the Buckeyes will need to prevent a repeat performance if they want to take down Michigan State.4. Ryan ShazierIf the OSU junior linebacker needed anymore motivation for Saturday’s showdown with the Spartans, he got it Tuesday night. Arguably the Buckeyes’ best defender, Shazier led the Big Ten with 122 tackles and 21 tackles for loss. He also recorded six sacks and forced four fumbles. He was passed over for the conference’s defensive player of the year award, though, which instead was given to Wisconsin’s senior linebacker Chris Borland. No disrespect to Borland, who finished third in the conference with 102 total tackles, but Shazier got snubbed on this one. It’s safe to say OSU would not be where it is right now — vying for a spot in the national title game — if it weren’t for Shazier. His production is across the board, and he could be out to prove his worth in what could be his final Big Ten game of his career if he decides to leave early for the NFL.5. Final Big Ten contest for some, maybe others tooA total of 18 players were honored Nov. 23 before OSU’s 42-14 victory against Indiana. Roby was among them, having confirmed his intentions to forego his final year of eligibility and enter the 2014 NFL Draft. Although Meyer has been mum on whether or not he’s held discussions with Miller and Shazier about leaving, if OSU wins Saturday and gets to the BCS title game, don’t be surprised if they bolt too. Having said that, look for each of them — in addition to OSU’s 15 other seniors — to look to do something special in their final Big Ten contest. It’s the biggest stage a Big Ten game can get, and big players tend to make big plays when the lights are the brightest.Correction: Dec. 6, 2013An earlier version of this story stated that the last time Ohio State went to a title game was in the 2002 season. In fact, it was the 2007 season. read more

Prof Smith, a professor of language and culture at the University of Sunderland, said the presenters were considered to be entertaining at the time but their approach amounted to bullying.“It was the power they had to tell people what to wear. It was a game where there was resistance from the contributor, but resistance was futile. It was always legitimised as being ‘for your own good’.“But participants were told they couldn’t wear clothes they were comfortable in, they could only wear clothes that Trinny and Susannah said they could wear,” Prof Smith said.“Those makeover programmes eventually morphed into dating programmes, with that element of humiliation and other forms of confrontation.”The report mentioned the aggression and confrontation evident in Gordon Ramsay’s shows, including Kitchen Nightmares, and The Apprentice, where candidates are frequently engaged in slanging matches and Lord Sugar conducts his boardroom showdowns. Sir Alan Sugar With their straight-talking advice on how to look fabulous, Trinny and Susannah styled themselves as fashion’s fairy godmothers.But academics have identified What Not To Wear, the makeover show presented by Trinny Woodall and Susannah Constantine, as a programme that began the “rise of rudeness” in television which reached its nadir with Jeremy Kyle.It features on a list that includes The Apprentice and Come Dine With Me, all helping British television to become “a sphere of anger, humiliation, dispute and upset”.The research, by university academics Angela Smith and Michael Higgins, has been submitted to MPs conducting a reality television inquiry sparked by the death of a participant on The Jeremy Kyle Show.The authors suggested that Kyle’s aggressive treatment of show participants was part of a wider shift. Each week, Woodall and Constantine would make over a contributor, first making her gaze into a 360 degree mirror wearing her own clothes and pointing out how unflattering they were.They used a sample episode to support their thesis, which Woodall told a woman that in her usual outfit “you look like you’ve just crawled out of bed”.Constantine said of the woman’s coat: “Do you know what? If I’m going to be completely frank, which I will be, you look like a hunchback in that.” Show more The Apprentice is also cited as one of the programmes which helped make television rudeCredit:Jim Marks/BBC Their study, Belligerent Broadcasting, traced the roots of aggressive television back to the 1960s and “the gradual disappearance of deference in political interviewing”.In the 1990s, The Jerry Springer Show was aired on British TV and set a template for the likes of Kyle as a confrontational host.But the authors of the report found that the “retreat of civility” in homegrown programmes spread beyond politics and talk shows with the arrival of What Not To Wear in 2001. But Prof Smith also singled out Come Dine With Me, with its jokey voiceover “framing everything as a potentially belligerent environment, managing to create a sense of disharmony or conflict – we can see the same thing done on Love Island.”Top Gear also contributed to today’s aggressive television, she argued, as Jeremy Clarkson’s “banter” with fellow presenters exemplified “a certain form of masculine, laddish culture” that has been copied by comedy panel shows.In their submissions to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee, which has heard evidence from the makers of The Jeremy Kyle Show, the academics said: “We found that there had been a rise in not only the frequency but also the range of programmes where conflict talk arises.As one genre of broadcast fell from favour, others adopted the frame of belligerence, each time amending it slightly to mark itself as ‘new’ but always with an underlying sense of interpersonal conflict and risk of humiliation.”They recommended that producers edit programmes to minimise the focus on conflict and should take into account the mental health of participants. The committee will deliver its findings later in the year.Woodall told The Sunday Telegraph: “I’m having lunch… really, I don’t have a comment.” Constantine was contacted for comment. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

first_imgAECI, the leading explosives and speciality chemicals company in Africa, and Thiess, one of the world’s largest mining contractors, have signed a five-year agreement for AECI’s entry in to Australia. Under the agreement, AEL Mining Services (AEL), a wholly owned subsidiary of AECI, will provide leading-edge explosives, initiating systems and technical services to Thiess in Australia. AECI says its entry into Australia “is aligned with the company’s clearly defined international growth strategy.” In addition to Australia, other geographies of interest are Africa, Brazil, Chile and Indonesia. Australia is one of the world’s largest producers of metallurgical and thermal coal and ferrous and non-ferrous metals. “The explosives industry is nearly six times the size of South Africa’s,” AECI reports.To prepare the groundwork, AECI Australia was registered as a legal entity in 2014. At the same time, a Managing Director was appointed, an office was opened in Brisbane and a site was developed in Bajool near Rockhampton in Queensland. The site includes an ammonium nitrate emulsion manufacturing facility imported from South Africa, as well as storage space. The modular design of the manufacturing facility is deployed globally and gives AEL the flexibility to grow capacity easily in the future. All the necessary regulatory approvals are in place. “The first 140 t of emulsion were manufactured on 25 November 2014 and a trial blast involving 550 electronic detonators was completed on 10 January 2015. Full explosives supply will commence in February,” says Mark Dytor, Chief Executive of AECI.“Recently, Thiess concluded an extensive review of the Australian explosives industry, particularly in terms of products and services. After identifying the need for a world-class service provider committed to delivering added value in a challenging commodity cycle, they decided to approach AEL with whom they have a long-standing working relationship in Indonesia,” AECI further reports.According to Michael Wright, Executive General Manager of Thiess in Australia, AEL is a world leader that employs highly skilled people, provides a comprehensive range of products and services and offers an international footprint that matches its global mining aspirations. “Most importantly, however, they’re fully committed to developing R&D programs that have the capacity to drive lower cost outcomes for mines. Given the competitive and complex state of mining, the partnership has the potential to be a real game-changer in the Australian mining industry.”Moving forward, AECI’s assets in Indonesia will be leveraged to facilitate the development of a regional supply chain framework. The company’s Australian leadership team, headed by Nigel Convey as Managing Director, is also progressing a new business pipeline, ensuring AECI’s emergence as a key role player in the Australian mining industry.last_img read more

first_imgOn the night of 7 May 1943, fifty-one British and Anzac soldiers gathered above Tripiti Gorge, a remote and uninhabited corner of western Crete, for a rescue that was two years overdue. As they made their way in the darkness from Nerospili cave above the beach to the water’s edge, they quietly bade farewell to their friends – the Cretans who had fed and sheltered them for so long. There would have been handshakes, powerful embraces, and probably tears. It was the last chapter of a remarkable story; the Cretan people’s courageous efforts to protect Allied soldiers on the run. Seventy years later, that last evacuation is being marked for the first time. The commemoration will take place next week with the unveiling of a bronze plaque at the entrance to the gorge, still as wild and windswept today as it was in 1943, and at villages which gave the soldiers sanctuary. Around 30 direct descendants of the soldiers from Australia, New Zealand and the UK are due to be present at the gorge ceremony. They will include the daughters of two of the 15 Diggers who left Crete that fateful night – Privates Charlie Hunter and Jack Simcoe. Children of the 14 Kiwis taken off will be there too, joining local families and dignitaries for the memorial’s commemoration. The plaque – with a Greek and English inscription telling of the historic events of 7 May 1943 – will sit on a stone plinth at the mouth of the gorge made by Sougia’s Yiorgo Gentikakis – otherwise known as ‘Captain George’. As the Greek flag is pulled away to reveal the bronze at midday on Tuesday, another rich layer in the story of the Anzacs and Crete will be marked for future generations. The Battle of Crete which ended on 1 June 1941 saw more than 5000 Anzac troops left behind after their courageous stand against the invading German forces. Most faced immediate imprisonment, but around 1000 soldiers went ‘on the run’, either evading capture, or escaping later from makeshift POW camps. Some 450 made it off the island – either through incredible individual journeys, or – in the majority of cases – by evacuations organised by the Royal Navy who spirited them off to the coast of North Africa. Most were picked up by ships or submarine from Crete’s southern coast within a year of the island’s fall, with Preveli being the most famous evacuation point. But for a small band of men, deliverance from Nazi occupied Crete had to wait. And wait they did, witnessing two long summers and winters, until May 1943. Almost two years after the last shots in the Battle of Crete had been fired, finally, they had escaped. That so many soldiers stayed on Crete for so long and how they survived is one of WWII’s great adventure stories. By the time the last evacuees made it to the Allied HQ for the Middle East in Cairo, the battle for Crete was history, but as the island’s resistance against the Germans continued, secrecy about their experiences was paramount. But the soldiers never forgot, and neither did their Cretan saviours. All through their ordeal, the troops owed their safety to Cretan families – who at great risk to themselves – ensured their well-being right up until that last fateful moonless night, when they waded out to the waiting Royal Navy motor launch. The Tripiti project’s organisers – historian Dr Ian Frazer and film maker John Irwin – who have travelled from New Zealand to Crete to co-ordinate the anniversary events – told Neos Kosmos that the commemoration is as much about the sacrifices made by those who helped the soldiers, as it is about the perseverance and endurance of the fugitives they protected. “Remembering Tripiti is an important opportunity to pay tribute to all who took part,” said Dr Frazer.“There were those who tried to get off the island and failed, those who were successful, and those who had to wait longest to get away. “By doing this we hope their stories of two years of endurance and evasion, and the stories of those who sheltered and protected them, will be better understood.”John Irwin, who is making a documentary on the part played by Cretan women during the island’s occupation, said the anniversary “represents the first formal expression of gratitude to the people of Crete from the families of the Tripiti evacuees, on behalf of all escapers and evaders and all Australians and New Zealanders”.Memorial services between May 4 and May 8 commemorating the evacuation will also take place at Kousteryerako and other Selinou district villages which were involved in preparations for the escape. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

first_imgA geologist who took part in the excavation of the ancient burial mound in Amphipolis in northern Greece says the ancient tomb found together with a series of vaulted rooms wasn’t built at the same time, but somewhat later than the rooms themselves.Geologist Evangelos Kambouroglou also said that the mound inside which the rooms and the tomb were found is not man-made, as archaeologists had assumed, but a natural hill.He also said that the Lion of Amphipolis, a huge sculpture of a lion on a pedestal, which is more than 25 feet (7.5 metres) tall, was too heavy to have stood at the top of the tomb, as archaeologists had claimed.“The walls (of the tomb structure) can barely withstand half a ton, not the 1,500 tons that the lion sculpture is estimated to weigh,” Kambouroglou said.As for the box-like tomb that contained the remnants of five bodies, possibly more, “it is posterior to the main burial monument … the main tomb has been destroyed by looters, who left nothing,” said Kambouroglou. “The marble doors (of the monument) contain signs of heavy use, which means many visitors came and went.”The vaulted rooms had been dated to between 325 BC – two years before the death of ancient Greek warrior-king Alexander the Great – and 300 BC, although some archaeologists claimed a later date.Katerina Peristeri, the chief archaeologist in the recent excavation, had advanced the theory that a member of Alexander’s family or one of his generals could be buried in the tomb. But the discovery of the boxy grave and the five bodies cast doubt on that theory and Kambouroglou’s announcement appears to disprove it entirely. Alexander, who built an empire stretching from modern Greece to India, died in Babylon and was buried in the city of Alexandria, which he founded. The precise location of his tomb is one of the biggest mysteries of archaeology.His generals fought over the empire for years, during wars in which Alexander’s mother, widow, son and half-brother were all murdered – most near Amphipolis.The discovery of the tomb has seen international exposure, but the cash strapped Greek government says it won’t be giving any more funding to the site at this stage.Experts have been told to focus on the findings that have already been unearthed, Alternate Culture Minister Nikos Xydakis said during a visit to the site last week.“There are not many excavations in Greece that have received such support,” he said to the media. “At the moment, there is not a need for any more.”Source: AP, Kathimerini Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Governor salutes resident Mrs Rita Gardiner with award from Her Majesty The

first_img Related Items:HE Peter Beckingham presents Rita Gardiner with award from Queen, rita gardiner awarded by the queen, Rita Gardiner recognized for her work with women and sports in U.K overseas territories Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, September 29, 2016 – The Governor, Peter Beckingham, presented the award of the British Empire Medal on behalf of Her Majesty the Queen to Mrs Rita Gardiner for her services to sport and women in the Overseas Territories, especially TCI, on 29 September.At the presentation ceremony which was attended by members of Mrs Gardiner’s family and friends the Governor said:   “I am thrilled for Mrs Gardiner to receive this great distinction, and I am pleased to have the opportunity on behalf of Her Majesty The Queen to present this award to her.  Rita has made a big contribution to society in Turks and Caicos. She has been instrumental for longer than I know in raising our profile in sport, and for ensuring our rightful place in the region and the Commonwealth.  I saw first-hand in 2014 her enthusiasm for organising the Commonwealth Baton relay which landed in TCI on its way across more than 60 nations.  Her support for Delano Williams is fantastic, and it is clear from meetings with them both that our first Olympian has benefited from her advice, guidance and enthusiasm.  Rita travelled with Delano’s mother, with support from the Premier’s office, to Rio to watch Delano compete in the Olympic Games.“Finally we should not forget the work Rita has done to improve the lot of women in TCI society. Her path-breaking work as Director of the Gender Unit has been important in raising the profile of women in society, and she has been actively engaged in striving to reduce domestic violence.  We should salute Rita for what she has achieved for TCI in sport and the promotion of women.  The Award of a British Empire Medal is a wonderful recognition of her work, and she and her family and friends should take great pride in this important honor.”Commenting on her award, Mrs Gardiner said:   “I am honored and delighted to be a recipient of this Award by Her Majesty. Coming in the same year as TCI’s first Olympic athlete, my good friend Delano Williams, took part in the Olympic Games this is a big recognition of the strides we have made as a sporting nation competing on the world stage.  I am pleased to have played a part in that progress through my work with the Amateur Athletic Association and the Commonwealth Games Association.  I am pleased too that my work in helping to promote and safeguard the place of women in society is recognized with this Award.  This is an important and memorable day not only for me, but also for my wider TCI family. I am grateful for all the support I have received from so many people here and overseas.”In addition to receiving the British Empire Medal Mrs Gardiner will be entitled as a member of the Order Of the British Empire to use a special chapel in St. Paul’s Cathedral for baptisms of grandchildren.  There is also a special service in St Paul’s in November for new members, and a Ceremonial Service in Spring 2017 to mark the Order’s Centenary. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

Two outages leave over 4200 without power near City Heights and Rolando

first_imgTwo outages leave over 4,200 without power near City Heights and Rolando areas SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Two outages left just over 4,200 San Diego Gas & Electric customers without power Tuesday morning in the Rolando, City Heights and Oak Park areas.The first outage, affecting 4,159 customers, was reported at 2:52 a.m., according to San Diego Gas and Electric’s online outage map. The second outage, affecting 48 customers, was reported at 3:43 a.m.As of 7:15 a.m., power had been restored to all customers affected by the first outage, but the customers affected by the second outage remained without power, SDG&E spokeswoman Helen Gao said, adding that power was expected to be restored to the remaining customers by 9 a.m.Crews determined the first outage was caused by a tree that fell on power lines, Gao said. The cause of the second outage was still under investigation. KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Updated: 8:59 AMcenter_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: August 6, 2019 August 6, 2019last_img read more

first_imgPaper subsidies from the Chinese government are gouging U.S. manufacturing and could cost 5,000 jobs in Southwest Washington, according to a new analysis by the Economic Policy Institute.The study, commissioned by the Alliance for American Manufacturing, found that China has fueled its rapidly growing paper industry with more than $33.1 billion in government subsidies, undercutting the U.S. paper industry’s competitive advantages and allowing that country to overtake the U.S. to become the world’s largest producer of paper and paper products. Clark County has lost half its paper industry jobs in the past decade. There were 1,300 local paper jobs in 2009, down from 2,600 paper jobs in 1999. To the north, Cowlitz County’s paper industry contracted 42 percent over that time, to 2,100 jobs.Scott Bailey, Southwest Washington regional economist for the state Employment Security Department, said that China cannot shoulder all the blame for that decline.The industry has also lost jobs because of increased automation and corporate decisions to close, rather than upgrade, aging mills. “It comes down to profitability,” Bailey said. “There’s a cycle of new plants versus old plants. How much do you reinvest in the old plant and then finally pull the plug?”Scott Paul, executive director of Washington, D.C.-based Alliance for American Manufacturing, agreed that the Chinese government was not the sole cause of the industry’s decline.last_img read more

first_imgA Vancouver motorcyclist died Tuesday morning in a head-on crash with a tractor-trailer after the motorcycle crossed the centerline on state Highway 14 east of Washougal, according to Washington State Patrol.Matthew Runkle, 40, was traveling east on a Yamaha motorcycle at about 11:15 a.m. when he struck the tractor-trailer, which was loaded with recycled cans, WSP spokesman Will Finn said. The motorcycle then caught fire. A WSP trooper patrolling the area was one of the first to respond to the crash, which occurred just west of the Clark-Skamania county line and east of the Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge.“He saw the plume of smoke as he was coming around the corner,” Finn said. The trooper quickly called for more resources while the driver of the tractor-trailer, David Newman, 36, of Tacoma grabbed his fire extinguisher, Finn said. An off-duty firefighter who also happened upon the scene used the trooper’s fire extinguisher to help Newman quickly douse the flames.Runkle was pronounced dead at the scene.Newman was taken to PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center with neck pain, Finn said. His vehicle was towed from the scene. The two-lane stretch of highway was closed for about two and a half hours while WSP investigators documented the scene and collected evidence. The cause of the crash remains under investigation.last_img read more

Over 200 special needs children take flight above Opalocka

first_imgOPA-LOCKA, FLA. (WSVN) – It was special day for hundreds of children at the Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport.The nonprofit Vital Flight showed 253 special needs families that the sky really is the limit.Thirty-two pilots volunteered their time, talents and their aircraft for the event.“It is absolutely amazing, when these kids come off these airplanes, the smiles on their faces,” said Vital Flight pilot Michael Coviello.The pilot said some of the children who take part in these flights become inspired to pursue aviation. “I’ve actually had teachers in special needs programs call me and say, ‘My child in my class will not stop talking about this, and all they can think about is being a pilot someday,’” said Coviello. “They’ve gone from this notion that they’re challenged and limited to believing that sky’s the limit. It’s an amazing day.”This is the event’s 8th year in South Florida.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

B2B Exhibition Industry Continues to Grow

first_img B2B exhibition revenue suffered deep declines in 2008 and 2009, falling as much as 12 percent in Q2 2009, but has since rebounded alongside the overall domestic economy. Live events are the strongest source of revenue for B2B media companies, accounting for 44.6 percent of revenue in the first half of 2015, a figure that has generally remained consistent even as digital advertising revenues continue to eat away at print. The CEIR index examines performance metrics across fourteen industry sectors, including consumer goods, financial/legal/real estate, government, building/construction, and medical/health care, among others. Like in the first and second quarters, gross revenue saw the largest surge, up 4.6 percent from last year. Square feet followed at 3.3 percent, with exhibitors and professional attendance rising 2.9 and 1.6 percent, respectively. The U.S. business-to-business exhibition industry once again posted gains in the third quarter of 2015, growing 3.1 percent, according to The Center for Exhibition Industry Research’s (CEIR) measurement index, which takes into account gross revenue, net square feet of exhibit space, total exhibitors and profressional attendance figures. The industry has grown every quarter since early 2010, according to CEIR, but gains in 2015 have dwarfed those in recent years, with the index averaging quarterly year-over-year increases of 3.8 percent and outpacing overall GDP for the first time since 2013. Expansion slowed slightly in the third quarter compared to the first half of 2015, but still handily beat the quarterly increases from 2011 to 2014. Quarterly CEIR index year-on-year growth, 2008-2015last_img read more

Discussing Interoperability at SIIM 2015 with David Brown

first_img Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology View all 220 items SIIM Chair David Brown discusses interoperability, and his concerns from a data security and compliance perspective, at SIIM 2015. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:21Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:21 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Videos | Information Technology | June 04, 2015 Discussing Interoperability at SIIM 2015 with David Brown Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Find more SCCT news and videoscenter_img SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Women’s Health View all 62 items Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Conference Coverage View all 396 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.last_img read more

Mirada Medical Showcases DLCExpert AIBased Radiotherapy Contouring Software at ASTRO 2018

first_img News | Proton Therapy | August 08, 2019 MD Anderson to Expand Proton Therapy Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center unveiled plans to expand its Proton Therapy Center during a… read more The top piece of content in July was a video interview explaining how Princess Margaret Cancer Center is using machine learning to create automated treatment plans. This was a hot topic at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting in July.  News | Treatment Planning | October 31, 2018 Mirada Medical Showcases DLCExpert AI-Based Radiotherapy Contouring Software at ASTRO 2018 Artificial intelligence software brings quality and consistency to the task of contouring critical structures for radiation treatment planning October 31, 2018 — Medical imaging software company Mirada Medical showcased its DLCExpert at the recent American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2018 annual meeting, oct. 21-24 in San Antonio, Texas. The product, which has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance, is the world’s first artificial intelligence (AI)-powered autocontouring solution. The software is already in use in multiple academic medical centers worldwide.DLCExpert automatically generates contours that users often find indistinguishable from those drawn by clinical experts, according to Mirada Medical. The software has been shown to bring quality and consistency to the task of contouring critical structures for radiation treatment planning.DLCExpert received CE Marking for the European market earlier this year. Medical institutions across Europe are currently commissioning the product to exploit the significant benefits that AI brings to their contouring workflow.Andre Dekker, professor of clinical data science, Department of Radiation Oncology at the Maastro Clinic in Maastricht, The Netherlands, stated, “The contours generated by DLCExpert are the closest to clinically acceptable contours we’ve seen from any autocontouring system we have evaluated. For some organs, our clinicians found it very hard to distinguish between their own contours and those that were automatically generated”.U.S. regulatory clearance for DLCExpert was granted as part of the FDA 510(k) for Workflow Box 2.0, Mirada’s Zero-Click automation platform. DLCExpert is available as an option, along with five additional Zero-Click workflows, including multi-modal autocontouring, routing of data and support for the integration of custom applications.For more information: www.mirada-medical.com FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 News | Proton Therapy | August 06, 2019 IBA Signs Contract to Install Proton Therapy Center in Kansas IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A.) recently signed a contract and received the first payment for a Proteus One solution… read more News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 14, 2019 Efficacy of Isoray’s Cesium Blu Showcased in Recent Studies August 14, 2019 — Isoray announced a trio of studies recently reported at scientific meetings and published in medica read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 02, 2019 Varian Showcases Cancer Care Systems and Software at AAPM 2019 Varian showcased systems and software from its cancer care portfolio, including the Identify Guidance System, at the… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 First Patient Enrolled in World’s Largest Brain Cancer Clinical Trial Henry Ford Cancer Institute is first-in-the-world to enroll a glioblastoma patient in the GBM AGILE Trial (Adaptive… read more News | Radiation Therapy | August 16, 2019 Drug Accelerates Blood System’s Recovery After Radiation, Chemotherapy A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 15, 2019 Mevion and C-RAD Release Integration for Improved Proton Therapy Treatment Quality Mevion Medical Systems and C-RAD announced the integration between the C-RAD Catalyst PT and the Mevion S250i proton… read more News | Patient Positioning Radiation Therapy | August 07, 2019 Qfix kVue One Proton Couch Top Validated by Mevion Medical Systems Qfix and Mevion Medical Systems announced that a special version of the kVue One Proton couch top is now both validated… read more Following radiation, the bone marrow shows nearly complete loss of blood cells in mice (left). Mice treated with the PTP-sigma inhibitor displayed rapid recovery of blood cells (purple, right). Credit: UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center/Nature Communications Catalyst PT image courtesy of C-RAD Related Content Feature | August 05, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor Most Popular Radiology and Radiotherapy Topics in July 2019 August 5, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology New (ITN) magazine website fr read more The MD Anderson Proton Therapy Center expansion is expected to be completed in 2023. Rendering courtesy of Stantec. News | Radiation Oncology | July 31, 2019 Laura Dawson, M.D., FASTRO, Chosen as ASTRO President-elect The members of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) elected four new officers to ASTRO’s Board of… read morelast_img read more

Love is in the air this Valentines Day

first_imgMt Lofty House, MGallery HVR VerandahLove is in the air this Valentine’s DayNew South WalesHarbour Rocks Hotel, MGallery by SofitelThis Valentine’s Day guests at Harbour Rocks Hotel’s Scarlett Restaurant are invited to enjoy a four course degustation dinner, plus a glass of bubbles on arrival and a red rose. Priced from $160.00 per person, or $130.00 per person for AccorPlus members. The meal must be fully prepaid and is non-refundable, subject to availability and conditions apply. To book, visit www.harbourrocks.com.au.Novotel Lake CrackenbackGuests are invited to rekindle their romance in the picturesque Snowy Mountains with the High Country Romance Package at Novotel Lake Crackenback. The package includes two nights accommodation, buffet breakfast daily, a two course dinner at Alpine Larder, a relaxing 45 minute massage for each guest, late check-out and complimentary resort activities including tennis courts and archery. Priced from $479 per person, the package is subject to availability and conditions apply. To book, visit www.lakecrackenback.com.au.Sofitel Sydney WentworthThis Valentine’s Day Sofitel Sydney Wentworth presents High Tea au Chocolat. The hotel’s renowned pastry team has partnered with the chocolatiers of Weiss chocolate to create a sinfully sweet surprise for guests to share with their amour. Priced from $69 per person, $79 per person including a glass of sparkling wine and $89 per person including a glass of Vevue Clicquot. For more information and to book, visit www.sofitelsydney.com.au.Pullman Quay Grand Sydney HarbourThe Ultimate Romance Package is presented by Pullman Quay Grand Sydney Harbour this Valentine’s Day. Guests will enjoy an indulgent three course dinner and bottle of Champagne for two, served by a butler from their very own private balcony of one of the hotel’s luxurious suites. The suites offer one the world’s most romantic views of Sydney Harbour and the Sydney Harbour Bridge. Priced from $1,199, the package also includes overnight accommodation, early check in, late check out and breakfast for two at Q Dining. Subject to availability and conditions apply. To book, visit www.pullmanquaygrandsydneyharbour.com.PerthMercure PerthThis Valentine’s Day, the Chef at Mercure Perth has designed a menu allowing guests to choose from romantically themed two, three or five course dinner options. Menu selections include indulgent oysters, soft shell crab and duck. Priced from $45 per person, including a glass of bubbles on arrival. To book call 08 9326 7000 or email H1754-FB1@accor.com.Novotel Perth LangleyGuests are invited to celebrate Valentine’s Day at Novotel Perth Langley. The hotel is offering a set menu at Senses Restaurant, including seafood options and an indulgent dessert trilogy. Priced from $65 per person or $50 per person for Accor Plus Members. To book visit, novotelperthlangley.com.au.AdelaideMt Lofty House, MGallery by Sofitel This Valentine’s Day, guests at Mt Lofty House, MGallery by Sofitel can enjoy a three, four or seven course dinner menu designed for romance at Hardy’s Verandah Restaurant (awarded three hats by the Australian Good Food Guide). Each in-house guest will be welcomed with a glass of the hotel’s Sequoia sparkling wine, and guests staying in the hotel’s Valley View rooms will be treated to a complimentary bottle of wine to be shared on the balcony and paired with stunning views. The menus are priced from $95 per person for three courses, $109 per person for four courses and $160 per person for seven courses. To book, visit www.mtloftyhouse.com.au.QueenslandMercure Kingfisher Bay Resort Fraser IslandGuests are invited to enjoy Valentine’s Day at Kingfisher Bay Resort on the stunning Fraser Island. The Fraser Romance Package includes three nights’ accommodation in a spa room, buffet breakfast daily, a complimentary bottle of wine and cheese platter at the Sunset Bar, a 30 minute massage per person and return passenger ferry transfers (ex River Heads). Priced from $498, the package is subject to availability and conditions apply. To book visit, www.kingfisherbay.comPullman Palm Cove Sea Temple Resort and SpaGuests are invited to treat their Valentine this year to a very special private dining experience at Pullman Palm Cove. The hotel’s ‘Red Romance Dinner’ allows guests to retreat to their suite with their valentine to enjoy a privately hosted dinner complete with red roses, chocolates and a Valentine’s Day degustation dinner. Priced from $499 per couple, subject to availability and conditions apply. To book, call 07 4059 9600 or email H8761@accor.com.Northern TerritoryAyers Rock ResortThis Valentine’s Day guests are invited to indulge in the Mayu Wiru Exclusive Dining Experience. The evening begins with canapes and Champagne on a private look-out at Sails in the Desert. This is followed by an exclusive dinner served at the hotel’s private dining room during which guests will enjoy four exquisite courses infused with ancient Indigenous flavours and paired with premium wine. Mayu Wiru takes on the ancient Pitjantjatjara name for ‘beautiful flavour’ and serves up a truly innovative menu highlighted by our executive chef’s artistic use of Indigenous flavours and the unmistakable presence of exceptional service. After dinner, guests will be transferred to the Field of Light dune top to take in panoramic views of the Field of Light exhibition and the sparkling sky above. While guests enjoy a digistif the resident star talker will take them on a guided journey through the Southern night sky. The evening concludes with a private tour through the Field of Light where guests will be immersed by the 50,000 softy glistening lights of this global art phenomenon. The Mayu Wiru Exclusive Dining Experience is priced from $295pp and bookings can be made online at www.ayersrockresort.com.au.Source = AccorHotelslast_img read more

HUD Secretary Castro to Announce Hillary Clinton Endorsement Thursday

first_img October 14, 2015 627 Views in Daily Dose, Government, Headlines, News Share Julián CastroHillary ClintonHUD Secretary Julián Castro, whose name has been bantered for months as a possible vice presidential candidate, plans to announce his endorsement for former U.S. Secretary of State and Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton on Thursday, according to multiple media sources.Castro, 41, has been HUD Secretary since July 2014. Prior to becoming the country’s top housing official, Castro served as mayor of San Antonio from 2009 to 2014. His twin brother, Joaquin, a Democratic U.S. Senator from Texas, has already endorsed Clinton and done some campaigning for her.Clinton is hopeful that the endorsement from Julián Castro will aid her in the attempt to win the Hispanic vote for the 2016 presidential election as the race with Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders for the Democratic nomination tightens, according to reports. Clinton has a history of popularity with Hispanic voters. In the 2008 Democratic Primaries, Hispanic voters chose Clinton over then-Senator Barack Obama by a 2 to 1 margin, according to CNN. The news station reported that the announcement of Castro’s endorsement will come at a grassroots event in Texas called Latinos for Hillary.Castro had dinner with former President Bill Clinton in August 2014, which is seen by many as the point that began speculation about Castro becoming Hillary’s running mate, according to the Washington Post. Castro has always deflected conjecture that he would be on the ticket for VP in 2016.In reaction to the news that Castro was endorsing Clinton for president, the GOP was critical of both Clinton and Castro.”Hillary Clinton and Julián Castro have one thing in common: no one has any idea what they’ve accomplished,” Republican National Convention Spokeswoman Ruth Guerra said in a statement. “This endorsement will do nothing to save Hillary’s flailing campaign in the midst of plummeting poll numbers and an FBI investigation into the mishandling of classified information on her secret email server.”Castro defended Clinton when asked by CNN about the email controversy, stating the information was not classified at the time she handled it and that it did not become classified until after the fact.Castro’s pending announcement of his endorsement of Clinton for president was first announced by Buzzfeed, according to CNN.center_img Endorsement Hillary Clinton HUD Secretary Castro 2015-10-14 Seth Welborn HUD Secretary Castro to Announce Hillary Clinton Endorsement Thursdaylast_img read more