first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion It appears that Republicans have joined ranks to support Trump’s attacks on the FBI. Do you know what you call the FBI that’s controlled by the president? KGB. Gestapo. No patriot will defend that course of action or attitude. So-called conservatives need to understand that there never has been a liberal dictator. Liberal dictator is an oxymoron. People who don’t accept, don’t need the oxy.Frank ElflandCharltonMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsPolice: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the…Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionSupport Johnstown sports, bus serviceTwo years in a row, only 60 percent of the school system’s budget was approved.Cuts were made and as a result our kids’ education rights were watered down.This year, our sports programs were dropped except for the transportation costs.Other important non-sports programs were also dropped or curtailed.A sports booster group is trying to raise $311,000 to resurrect sports on an “all-or-nothing” basis.Our student-athletes won’t have the means to properly develop like at other schools.A fundraiser is scheduled on Aug. 24, but fall practices start before then.I strongly suggest Johnstown fans and friends to get out a check right away to Johnstown Purple and Gold, 1 Sir Bill Circle, Johnstown, NY 12095.If our sports opponents could agree that Johnstown play all games at home, for this year only, put the approved transportation funds towards the $311,000 required.We could reciprocate by playing all away games in the near future.No scheduled bus service in Johnstown is also an issue. Johnstown refused to pay the Gloversville Transit System’s increased annual charge.Buses run through Johnstown, but there are no scheduled stops. The two mayors of both cities have said they would study the situation, but nothing has happened.The Fulton County Office of the Aging runs buses for qualified people, with limited service.The Gloversville Transit System runs one para-transit bus, but only for qualified people.There are two taxi companies in Gloversville that come to Johnstown.Can someone help?Tom FarnanJohnstownWhitney brought her light to manyCreative Magic Sunshine. That is my name for Marylou Whitney.I met Marylou, briefly, at the champagne flight of the Concorde in Schenectady. I won a Concorde flight for the celebration.Later, I received an invitation to her summer gala at her Cady Hill Estate and a copy of her husband’s book, “A Year with a Millionaire.”Many readers are jealous of Mrs. Whitney. They call her “a media headlines glutton.”I defended her in print. Her kind deeds (charities) make many a heart glow.Creative Magic Sunshine is Mrs. Whitney’s name.Rob CurtissSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

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first_imgWith biting irony, journalist Nicolas Quenel recommended poor families read the diary of her bucolic confinement in Le Monde newspaper to “ease the tension of living in 15 square meters”.Apartments in the French capital are often tiny, with nearly a quarter of the population living in 30 square meters or less. Celebrated writer Marie Darrieussecq got similar treatment for describing trips to the sea and deer grazing in the garden of her second home.Fellow novelist Diane Ducret was not impressed.  When bestselling French novelist Leila Slimani — the author of The Perfect Nanny– admitted that she felt “a little like Sleeping Beauty” contemplating the coronavirus lockdown from the comfort of her country home, she hit a very raw nerve.Class tensions, never very far from the surface despite the fine sentiments of the French national motto “liberty, fraternity and equality”, exploded.Parisians without second homes to flee to excoriated her on social media, with the economist Thomas Porcher, author of Les Delaisses (which roughly translates as “Those Left Behind”), calling Slimani “indecent”. Stuck in a two-room flat, and unable to see the sky, she said they were typical of a certain caste of France’s out-of-touch intellectual elite “for whom the revolution doesn’t seem to have happened”.She compared Slimani to the “Marie Antoinette playing at being a farmer” in the gardens of the Palace of Versailles, and “just about as in touch with fear and anguish of the people”.The French queen later lost her head to the angry Parisian poor.In a scathing take-down of Slimani’s diary in Marianne magazine, Ducret described how her elderly neighbour recently killed himself by throwing himself from the window of his tiny bedsit because the owner wanted to sell it, condemning him to the street.The virus has “shown up our inequalities,” she said. “When it comes to a  certain social class… when our precious liberty is called into question, equality becomes just an ideal,” she added.When France declared its lockdown three weeks ago, an estimated one fifth of the population of the capital escaped to the country and the seaside, sparking a wave of resentment in the provinces.Many accused “selfish Parigots” — slang for Parisians — of spreading the virus.Indeed Darrieussecq sheepishly wrote about using her second car in the country because “it’s not good to drive around” in Paris plates.Young fashion designer Romain Mittica chose to stay in his bedsit in a poorer corner of northern Paris rather than to travel back to the east of France and risk infecting his parents.Reaching out his arms he can almost touch the two walls. “I leave the window open so I don’t feel so closed in,” he said.But at least he only has to live with himself.An exasperated grandmother called Kouther told AFP that she was “losing her mind” trying to keep her five grandchildren entertained in a 30-square-meter apartment.”We are going to kill each other if this goes on any longer,” she said as the children ran around a bare square at the foot of a cluster of high-rise blocks.Playgrounds and parks have been closed since the start of the lockdown, with French people only allowed out for exercise once a day, as long as they don’t stray more than one kilometer from home.”You cannot keep children locked up like this. It’s wrong. They can’t play with their friends,” Kouther added. “They are fighting from morning to night.”The children’s father is a self-employed delivery driver who has had to keep working to keep his contracts. Their mother works in a supermarket, which is also open. Like Slimani, 63-year-old Kouther was born in Morocco, but the similarities end there. “The rich don’t care — they wouldn’t be rich if they did,” she said. But even as she continued to glory in the bliss of the country, Slimani — whose book, called Lullaby in the UK, is about two children murdered by their nanny — acknowledged that not everyone was so lucky. “We are not equal,” she wrote. “The days that come will deepen those inequalities with certain cruelty.”Topics :last_img read more